energy efficient businesses

Atmos: Banking for Sustainable Energy

A New Way to Support Sustainable Energy

Do you know where and how your bank is investing your paycheck? If you bank with one of the big banks, your deposits are almost definitely funding the fossil fuel industry.

To help make it easy to align your money with your values, we’ve partnered with Atmos, a climate-positive banking platform where you can earn a high interest rate on deposits while helping to scale clean energy solutions. Atmos will donate $20 to Energy Alabama for every new account, and you can rest easy knowing that 100% of your FDIC-insured deposits are funding innovative technologies and infrastructure to build a clean energy future. And, when you choose to give regularly to Energy Alabama – or any of the climate non-profits on their platform – Atmos will double your savings rate.

Here at Energy Alabama, we know that true sustainability means improving family conditions, public health, and economic development. We understand the power of markets to scale clean energy solutions that will improve the lives of all Alabamans. That’s why we’re excited to join the Atmos platform. When you bank with Atmos, you’re building the clean energy future as you sleep, swipe or save.

How to Join

Sign up using this link, and Atmos will donate $20 to Energy Alabama. Two minutes is all it takes to put your money to work.

About Atmos

Atmos Financial is a climate-positive banking platform that scales up climate positive solutions. 

Atmos offers FDIC-insured checking and high-yield savings accounts for individuals, and invests 100% of every dollar deposited into clean energy projects. When you bank with Atmos, you’re building the clean energy future as you sleep, swipe or save.

Atmos has no minimum balance, and provides a fee-free platform for donating to non-profits, like Energy Alabama. And, it offers best-in-class rates — and doubles them when you use your account to donate on a regular basis.

Atmos is included in: 

Learn more about Atmos.

Energy vs Power

Understanding What Demand Response Can Do for You

So what is demand response? It is a change in USAGE of energy of an electric utility customer to better match the demand for power with the supply. It can also be thought of as a method of how electric companies compensate for the extra energy used during a “peak time”. When you hear “peak time”, think of a hot Alabama summer day when everyone is running their air conditioners at 2 PM.

What is demand?

Electric energy cannot be easily stored, so utilities have traditionally matched demand and supply by throttling the production rate of their power plants, taking generating units on or off line, or importing power from other utilities. But there are limits to what can be achieved on the supply side, as some generating units can take a long time to come up to full power, some may be very expensive to operate, and demand can be greater than the capacity of all the available power plants put together. Demand response is one of the solutions to these limits and seeks to adjust the demand for power instead of adjusting the supply.

At the consumer level, demand response is a way for certain areas to maintain adequate power during busier peak times and can save them money in the process. One example of this was in 2016, when the New York City grid “shed load” by reducing power at a number of public services, including the Metropolitan Transportation Authority; and utility ConEdison activated a voluntary program to adjust consumers’ air-conditioner thermostats at peak hours. In exchange for participating in these voluntary programs, electricity customers received a rebate varying in amount based on participation.

To help visualize what this looks like, think about the traffic on an interstate. Everyone suffers if the traffic is at a standstill; but once portions of traffic begins taking proper detour routes or delaying their trip, it allows everyone to get to their destination faster. Similarly, if some consumers participate in demand response by lessening their own energy use, or when they use it, then everyone on the grid can maintain their energy usage during peak hours at cheaper prices.

While the main goal of demand response is to maintain energy availability through all times of the year, consumers can earn financial rewards by participating. In many states, regulators create incentives for utilities to use less energy, especially during peak hours of the day. Demand response programs were originally put in place to avoid having to turn on “peaker plants,” or auxiliary power plants that may be used only 10 days a year to meet the traffic of high demand days. You can imagine how expensive these “peaker plants” are to operate by thinking about if we added lanes to our highways just to accommodate Black Friday traffic.

Instead of building new power plants to meet demand, utilities instead can rely on demand response. For example, in New York, 543 megawatts of demand reduction are available just from commercial and industrial customers participating in demand response, which is about the same capacity as a medium size power plant. Keeping these plants idle also helps keep the price of power down, which saves money for the entire customer base. Instead of having to call on very expensive power generators to meet high demand in the late afternoon, grid operators can reduce the load in the system and avoid paying peak-time pricing.

Much like consumers, demand response saves the system money, sometimes on the upper end of millions a week, but the program also creates a better and safer grid in doing so. The grid benefits from not needing to build any extra power plants to supply power during those “peaker times”, which are only about 10 days out of the year, which in turn would require extra power to operate and build. Furthermore, if consumers are using the demand response program, the grid will be less taxed for power output on a daily basis. By conserving energy, grid alterations can be delayed or significantly reduced. In an electricity grid, electricity consumption and production must balance at all times; any significant imbalance could cause grid instability or severe voltage fluctuations, and cause failures within the grid. Don’t forget that demand response can ALSO be used to INCREASE demand during periods of high supply and/or low demand, which, unchecked, could cause an imbalance.

Overall, demand response is beneficial to everyone involved. It saves consumers, businesses, and utilities, money and helps the grid run more efficiently. If given the opportunity, everyone should opt-in to this program for themselves, the grid, and the environmental benefits from using less energy. And if you don’t currently have the opportunity, ask your utility and your Public Service Commission about starting demand response programs to save you money.

Related: Probing Residential Demand Charges

Battery Storage and Ancillary Services

Ancillary services by definition are services that support the transmission of electricity from its generation site to the customer or helps maintain its usability throughout the system. Many people may not know that the standard 120 volts we are used to receiving from the wall actually varies a tiny amount from second to second. If you were to monitor the power from the wall, the voltage may swing from 118-122 volts. We do not typically think about the mechanisms that take place to keep our power useful and ready for when we flip the switch.

On a larger scale, ancillary services are generators or other service providers that are synchronized to the grid and are able to rapidly increase output in three major categories: contingency, regulation, and flexibility reserves. The contingency reserve requirement is assumed to be constant for all hours of the year and corresponds to a spinning reserve equal to about 3% of peak load and about 4.5% of the average load. Another way to think of “spinning reserves” are the backup or redundancy built into the grid. Basically, we slightly overbuild the total generation needed so the grid can be provided with ancillary services making good quality power possible.

Additionally, regulation and flexibility reserve requirements vary by hour based on the net load and impact of variability and uncertainty of wind and solar. The availability and constraints of individual generators to provide reserves are a major source of the cost of providing reserves. Not all generators are capable of providing certain regulation reserves based on operational practice or lack of necessary equipment to follow a regulation signal.

So, what does the future of ancillary services hold and how can they be more beneficial?

At a residential level, a combination of solar and storage is only worthwhile when specific conditions are met that make the value of storage greater than the cost of installing It. For example, when the renewable energy creates an excess, the extra energy can be stored for later consumption. This would allow the customer to buy less power from the grid and enable them to cut their costs.

However, some customers are now being charged for using power during peak times, which is known as a demand charge. Energy storage can be used to lower peak time energy consumption, or the highest amount of power a customer draws from the grid; therefore, reducing the amount customers spend on demand charges. In North America, the break-even point for most demand charges is $9 per kilowatt. Energy storage can lower that cost to $4 or $5 per kilowatt by as early as 2020. As storage costs decrease, more customers will begin to see economic benefits and existing storage users will see the optimum size of energy storage increase.

Lastly, energy storage will impact electricity grids as a whole because it provides more function than just power on demand. Batteries can provide the grid with ancillary services like frequency regulation and should be compensated to do so. All this is to say, if utilities provide appropriate price signals to the market, customers will respond by installing battery storage where and how they can be compensated.

Currently, grids experience a continuous imbalance between the power they produce and its consumption because of the millions of devices that are turned on and off in an unrelated way. The imbalance can cause frequencies to deviate, which can affect equipment and potentially hurt the stability of the grid. Energy storage is well suited for frequency regulation because of its rapid response time and its ability to charge and discharge efficiently. This storage could significantly reduce the amount and cost of the reserves currently needed to provide such services to the grid.

One reason for the optimistic outlook on battery storage’s role with providing ancillary services is the progress lithium ion batteries have made in recent years. In 2015, lithium-ion batteries were responsible for 95 percent of energy storage at both the residential and grid levels. The reason for the increase in popularity is due to the price dropping, safety improving, and better performance characteristics. All of these qualities are leading to lithium-ion batteries being suitable for stationary energy storage across the grid; ranging from large-scale installations and transmission infrastructure to individual and residential use, even without being appropriately compensated for ancillary services.

The most important aspect is the large-scale deployment of energy storage that could overturn the status quo for many electricity markets. In developed countries, central or bulk generation traditionally has been used to satisfy instantaneous demand, with ancillary services helping to smooth out discrepancies between generation and load; and energy storage is well suited to provide such ancillary services. Eventually, as costs fall, it could move beyond that role, providing more and more power to the grid, displacing plants; however, that time has not yet come although approaching quickly. It is important to recognize that energy storage has the potential to upend the industry structures, both physical and economic, that have defined power markets for the last century or more.

Media Fusion uses solar power to brighten bottom line

In May, Media Fusion added solar energy panels to its building to help supplement its power supply. The company “sells kilowatts back to the grid” and the company is credited a certain portion back from the utility company each month.

“I think the environmental part is a very big part, but let’s just set that aside. Let’s look at this from a business standpoint. This is a no-brainer from a business standpoint,” said Media Fusion Inc. President Richard Williams said. “My job as president of the company is to help us be efficient in operations and as a government contractor the government looks to us and we are graded on the efficiency of our business.”

Energy Alabama analyzed the Media Fusion building for energy saving possibilities and recommended solar panels for its flat roof.

To read the full article, please visit: http://www.al.com/business/index.ssf/2017/06/media_fusion_uses_solar_power.html

Huntsville Business Installs Solar Panels to Reduce Energy Consumption

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – A Huntsville business is taking advantage of sunlight to save some serious cash.

Media Fusion, Inc. is a Huntsville business and the latest to join the North Alabama Buildings Performance Challenge and install solar panels.

“Energy Alabama was the key for us,” said McElyea. “If it weren’t for Energy Alabama, we wouldn’t have flipped the switch.”

To read the full article, please visit: http://whnt.com/2017/06/02/huntsville-business-installs-solar-panels-to-reduce-energy-consumption/

To view the installation under construction (time-lapse), please visit:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rdwglsBF0g