Atmos: Banking for Sustainable Energy

A New Way to Support Sustainable Energy

Do you know where and how your bank is investing your paycheck? If you bank with one of the big banks, your deposits are almost definitely funding the fossil fuel industry.

To help make it easy to align your money with your values, we’ve partnered with Atmos, a climate-positive banking platform where you can earn a high interest rate on deposits while helping to scale clean energy solutions. Atmos will donate $20 to Energy Alabama for every new account, and you can rest easy knowing that 100% of your FDIC-insured deposits are funding innovative technologies and infrastructure to build a clean energy future. And, when you choose to give regularly to Energy Alabama – or any of the climate non-profits on their platform – Atmos will double your savings rate.

Here at Energy Alabama, we know that true sustainability means improving family conditions, public health, and economic development. We understand the power of markets to scale clean energy solutions that will improve the lives of all Alabamans. That’s why we’re excited to join the Atmos platform. When you bank with Atmos, you’re building the clean energy future as you sleep, swipe or save.

How to Join

Sign up using this link, and Atmos will donate $20 to Energy Alabama. Two minutes is all it takes to put your money to work.

About Atmos

Atmos Financial is a climate-positive banking platform that scales up climate positive solutions. 

Atmos offers FDIC-insured checking and high-yield savings accounts for individuals, and invests 100% of every dollar deposited into clean energy projects. When you bank with Atmos, you’re building the clean energy future as you sleep, swipe or save.

Atmos has no minimum balance, and provides a fee-free platform for donating to non-profits, like Energy Alabama. And, it offers best-in-class rates — and doubles them when you use your account to donate on a regular basis.

Atmos is included in: 

Learn more about Atmos.

New Survey Results: Alabama Voters Want Energy Freedom in a BIG Way

In Alabama, we are all about freedom and market choices, and that’s as true of our energy use as anything else.

Alabama Wants Renewable Energy Choices

Recent results from a survey of 600 likely Alabama voters show that Alabamians want freedom of choice, a competitive marketplace, and the right and opportunity to choose where their energy comes from – and the right to produce their own electricity if they want.

That means more energy providers and more renewable energy sources – which is exactly what Alabamians are asking for: 81% support the development of clean energy like solar and wind. 79% say it’s important to them to have the choice to buy power from a company that uses more renewable energy sources such as wind and solar.

An even higher total of 83% agree that increasing our use of renewable energy sources in Alabama, such as wind and solar, will create jobs and encourage economic development throughout the state.

More choices, more renewable energy AND more jobs and a stronger economy? It’s a no brainer!

What About Our Utilities?

Specifically, Alabamians want to see more development from their public utilities. A whopping 90% of respondents think we should accelerate the growth of clean energy so that we can produce more of our own electricity in Alabama and rely less on importing from other states and countries. 87% think the public electric utilities should lead the way in developing renewable energy options for customers. Unfortunately, most Alabama utilities have been doing the exact opposite.

A big motivator for this stance appears to be a desire for Alabama to be independent. 90% support the acceleration of the growth of clean energy so that we can produce more of our own electricity in Alabama and rely less on importing from other states and countries.

The Politics of Renewable Energy in Alabama

Clean energy is good politics, too. Alabama voters across the political spectrum say it is important that a candidate share their opinion on energy issues. And as we’ve seen in these results, a significant majority across party lines support the development of clean energy in the state.

Alabamians know that more renewable energy = more jobs, stronger economy, more choices, and a more competitive energy market.

There is a lot more to these survey results, like what Alabama voters think of the solar tax (spoiler alert: they don’t like it). Read more and see the data for yourself.

 

Header image source: Unsplash

Alabama makes it harder than any other state for companies to use clean energy, report says

Alabama finished dead last in an index of all 50 states that examined how easily companies could use clean energy like solar and wind power to meet their electricity needs.

The report, titled the Corporate Clean Energy Procurement Index, was released in January by the Retail Industry Leaders Association, a trade group representing large-scale retailers like Target, Walmart, Best Buy, Home Depot, Lowe’s and Dollar General.

For Daniel Tait — CEO of non-profit group Energy Alabama, which advocates for renewable energy policies within the state — the index results were disappointing but not surprising.

“We’re just kind of standing in our way,” he said. “If a company wants to go solar, for example, and participate in these types of projects, they have to work really, really hard here and they’re just going to go to a state somewhere else where it’s going to be a much easier pathway for them to make these types of investments.”

To continue reading the full article from AL.com, please visit: http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/02/alabama_clean_energy_rankings.html

Energy Alabama and GASP Weigh In on Clean Energy Incentive Program

Energy Alabama and GASP submitted comments to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to encourage changes to the Clean Energy Incentive Program (CEIP), part of the Clean Power Plan. Specifically Energy Alabama and GASP requested EPA more equitably define what constitutes a low income community, to use existing measurement and verification methods at use in the market, and to not retire emission rate credits (ERCs). We both believe these changes will provide more opportunities for energy efficiency and renewable energy benefits to accrue directly to low income families, the original goal of CEIP.

Our full comments can be read here: https://alcse.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Gasp-EA-Comment-FINAL-DRAFT.pdf

Distributed Generation benefits

Distributed Generation: What Are the Benefits?

Distributed Generation: What Are the Benefits?

Increased efficiency. Reduced rates. Improved reliability. Diminished emissions. If all of that sounds good to you, then you ought to know about the benefits of distributed generation.

A few weeks back, we covered microgrids and why they’re important in the context of the larger, main grid. As you might recall, microgrids are defined not by their size, but rather by their function—crucially, their ability to break off from the main grid and operate autonomously. Got it? Well, if that makes sense, think of distributed generation as a network of systems just like that.

That’s oversimplifying it a little, but the overall concept holds true. Distributed generation is when electricity comes from many small energy sources. Generally, these sources are local and renewable. They’re all connected to the larger grid but can also function separately.

If all this sounds unfamiliar, that’s because it’s not the “normal” way of doing things. But it does have its advantages.

The traditional model

In the traditional transmission and distribution (T&D) grid, large sources provide power to huge numbers of residential, commercial, and industrial customers. Some of those customers live close to the centralized power plants. Other live far away—sometimes very, very far.

In contrast, a distributed generation (DG) system has smaller, decentralized sources that generate electricity much closer to the people who use it. There are lots of producers, and even though they produce less individually, they’re all connected to the grid. Together, they can be quite effective.

Several technologies form the backbone of a DG system. Some of the most prominent are solar, wind, and hydro. Another is cogeneration, which is the production of electricity from what is essentially the leftover energy from other forms of generation. Yet another is an energy storage system, which stays connected to the grid and holds energy until it’s needed.

So what are the benefits of distributed generation? In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy released a report outlining some of DG’s advantages. Here’s what they came up with (h/t Energy.gov):

  • Increased electric system reliability
  • An emergency supply of power
  • Reduction of peak power requirements
  • Offsets to investments in generation, transmission, or distribution facilities that would otherwise be recovered through rates
  • Provision of ancillary services, including reactive power
  • Improvements in power quality
  • Reductions in land-use effects and rights-of-way acquisition costs
  • Reduction in vulnerability to terrorism and improvements in infrastructure resilience

Those are all really important concepts, but let’s focus on that first one.

Increased reliability, better performance

One way to think about the benefits of distributed energy is to visualize your cell phone’s network. Imagine for a moment that your carrier had only a few towers in just a few spots around the country. The towers would be massive and powerful, but you wouldn’t have the same reliability and coverage that you have now. The reasons should be obvious. With a network of smaller, more evenly placed towers, cell-phone carriers are able to provide the best service possible to their customers.

Distributed generation is no different. When centralized power plants transmit energy over long distances, some of that energy is lost. With distributed generation, the generators are closer to those who use the energy. Thus there’s less waste. Increased efficiency. In the old model, a loss in service at any point of the grid means everyone suffers. In the new model, that’s less likely to happen.

DG can also serve as a backup to the grid, acting as an emergency source for public services in the case of a natural disaster. Here in North Alabama, that kind of service could be invaluable after a tornado. And by producing energy locally, DG systems can reduce demand at peak times in specific areas and alleviate congestion on the main grid.

Finally, because distributed energy tends to come from renewable sources, it’s good for the environment. Using more renewables means lowering emissions. And lowering emissions makes the world a more enjoyable place for all of us.