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Atmos: Banking for Sustainable Energy

A New Way to Support Sustainable Energy

Do you know where and how your bank is investing your paycheck? If you bank with one of the big banks, your deposits are almost definitely funding the fossil fuel industry.

To help make it easy to align your money with your values, we’ve partnered with Atmos, a climate-positive banking platform where you can earn a high interest rate on deposits while helping to scale clean energy solutions. Atmos will donate $20 to Energy Alabama for every new account, and you can rest easy knowing that 100% of your FDIC-insured deposits are funding innovative technologies and infrastructure to build a clean energy future. And, when you choose to give regularly to Energy Alabama – or any of the climate non-profits on their platform – Atmos will double your savings rate.

Here at Energy Alabama, we know that true sustainability means improving family conditions, public health, and economic development. We understand the power of markets to scale clean energy solutions that will improve the lives of all Alabamans. That’s why we’re excited to join the Atmos platform. When you bank with Atmos, you’re building the clean energy future as you sleep, swipe or save.

How to Join

Sign up using this link, and Atmos will donate $20 to Energy Alabama. Two minutes is all it takes to put your money to work.

About Atmos

Atmos Financial is a climate-positive banking platform that scales up climate positive solutions. 

Atmos offers FDIC-insured checking and high-yield savings accounts for individuals, and invests 100% of every dollar deposited into clean energy projects. When you bank with Atmos, you’re building the clean energy future as you sleep, swipe or save.

Atmos has no minimum balance, and provides a fee-free platform for donating to non-profits, like Energy Alabama. And, it offers best-in-class rates — and doubles them when you use your account to donate on a regular basis.

Atmos is included in: 

Learn more about Atmos.

Energy Alabama is hiring for a Deputy Director!

Energy Alabama is a non-profit organization advancing Alabama’s clean energy future through education and advocacy. We are currently hiring for a Deputy Director. To view the full job description, including compensation information, click here.

To apply for the position, please submit an application (including resume and cover letter) via email to admin@alcse.org.

We will update you on the status of your application as soon as we can.

The requirements listed in our job descriptions are guidelines, not rules, and if you have most of the qualifications listed we encourage you to apply! Experience can refer to paid and unpaid work. Applying gives you an opportunity to be considered.

We are happy to answer any questions you might have at admin@alcse.org.

New Survey Results: Alabama Voters Want Energy Freedom in a BIG Way

In Alabama, we are all about freedom and market choices, and that’s as true of our energy use as anything else.

Alabama Wants Renewable Energy Choices

Recent results from a survey of 600 likely Alabama voters show that Alabamians want freedom of choice, a competitive marketplace, and the right and opportunity to choose where their energy comes from – and the right to produce their own electricity if they want.

That means more energy providers and more renewable energy sources – which is exactly what Alabamians are asking for: 81% support the development of clean energy like solar and wind. 79% say it’s important to them to have the choice to buy power from a company that uses more renewable energy sources such as wind and solar.

An even higher total of 83% agree that increasing our use of renewable energy sources in Alabama, such as wind and solar, will create jobs and encourage economic development throughout the state.

More choices, more renewable energy AND more jobs and a stronger economy? It’s a no brainer!

What About Our Utilities?

Specifically, Alabamians want to see more development from their public utilities. A whopping 90% of respondents think we should accelerate the growth of clean energy so that we can produce more of our own electricity in Alabama and rely less on importing from other states and countries. 87% think the public electric utilities should lead the way in developing renewable energy options for customers. Unfortunately, most Alabama utilities have been doing the exact opposite.

A big motivator for this stance appears to be a desire for Alabama to be independent. 90% support the acceleration of the growth of clean energy so that we can produce more of our own electricity in Alabama and rely less on importing from other states and countries.

The Politics of Renewable Energy in Alabama

Clean energy is good politics, too. Alabama voters across the political spectrum say it is important that a candidate share their opinion on energy issues. And as we’ve seen in these results, a significant majority across party lines support the development of clean energy in the state.

Alabamians know that more renewable energy = more jobs, stronger economy, more choices, and a more competitive energy market.

There is a lot more to these survey results, like what Alabama voters think of the solar tax (spoiler alert: they don’t like it). Read more and see the data for yourself.

 

Header image source: Unsplash

Alabama Rural Electric Cooperative Scorecard

Rural electric cooperatives (RECs) were established in the 1930s to provide power rural areas not seen as profitable to large investor-owned utilities. In Alabama there are 22 rural electric cooperatives (RECs) providing power to over a quarter of Alabama residents (and over 70% of Alabama’s land mass).

Rural electric cooperatives are member-owned (ie. customer owned), and return excess profits to the members. As such, members have certain rights to transparency and equity; to be able to attend board meetings and have input into the decisions the board is making on their behalf.

In addition to understanding their rights, members need to be able to see that their co-op is serving them well. It’s easy to say you are satisfied with your service when you have nothing to compare that service to. That’s where the Alabama REC Scorecard comes in.

Our team has evaluated all 22 Alabama RECs and scored them on over 40 different variables across three key areas. These scores allow you to do a side-by-side comparison of your REC with others in the state (or even those in other states), to see how what you have now compares to what you could have.

Of course, it’s not that simple. We spent months reaching out to every Alabama REC, with too many refusing to answer our questions or even return our many calls and emails. Many of these same RECs offer little to no information online for their members, making it even more difficult to properly assess them.

Three key areas evaluated

Democratic governance includes the ability for members to access bylaws, attend board meetings, vote on bylaw amendments, and generally have a say in the way the cooperative is run.

Financial Transparency & Compensation include things like the number of board members, CEO/board compensation, ratio of CEO salary to median household income.

Member programs include things like on-bill financing, energy efficiency financing programs, community solar, and broadband internet.

 

Summary of Alabama REC Scores:

Only 18% of Alabama RECs regularly inform their members of the date and time of upcoming board meetings.

64% of Alabama RECs allow members to attend and address board meetings.

No Alabama RECs ensure that all members have access to (via website, mail, or other means) their incorporation documents, bylaws, meeting minutes, IRS compensation forms, general financial and operational data, and strategic plan summary.

Only half of Alabama RECs have their bylaws published on their website. This lack of access to cooperative bylaws significantly reduces the ability of members to participate in the cooperative’s electoral process, engage in the bylaw amendment process, and hold their co-op accountable for possible corruption or misconduct.

Alabama Rural Electric Cooperative Scorecard author Q&A

Alabama Rural Electric Cooperative Scorecard author Q&A

Individual Alabama Coop Scores

Arab Electric Cooperative (AEC) seems to be making efforts to increase the ability for member-owners to understand and participate in the decision-making process. They are one of only four RECs that provide meeting minutes on their website, and one of only two co-ops that has the right for members to attend board meetings (without prior written approval) written into the bylaws. AEC is the only co-op in Alabama to have term limits for board members. In August 2020, amidst the Coronavirus pandemic, AEC proposed a bylaw amendment to eliminate mail-in voting.
Overall score: 43/122

Arab Electric Cooperative is the only co-op in Alabama to have term limits for board members

Baldwin EMC
Overall score: 24/122

Black Warrior EMC 
Overall score: 30/122

Central Alabama Electric Cooperative held virtual meetings with sign-language interpretation during Covid-19 to ensure accessibility. At least half of current board members were appointed rather than elected.
Overall score: 39/122

Cherokee Electric Cooperative 
Overall score: 27/122

Clarke-Washington EMC
Overall score: 13/122

Coosa Valley Electric Cooperative
Overall score: 42/122

Covington Electric Cooperative has recently began development on a community solar garden (the first Alabama co-op to do so). This development is a direct result of their efforts towards democratic governance. Additionally, CEC is the only Alabama REC that allows members to vote early, by mail, in-person, and online. CEC has demonstrated a commitment to gender equality through bylaw amendments relating to pronouns. CEC is one of only three Alabama RECs to offer regular loan-based on-bill financing program.
Overall score: 59/122

Covington Electric Cooperative serves as a spectacular example of intentionally promoting member-owner engagement. Not only are they the only Alabama co-op to allow voting by all four means possible (in-person, early voting, by mail, and online), their move to allow online and mail-in voting resulted in their largest voter turnout ever.

Cullman Electric Cooperative is one of the clear winners when it comes to promoting electric vehicles. At their 2020 virtual annual meeting they held an EV information session and demonstration of the the EV and charger owned by the co-op. CEC provides information on their website regarding upcoming board meetings, as well as meeting minutes, and instructions on how members can propose bylaw amendments. However, members can only attend or speak at board meetings with prior approval.
Overall score: 55/122

Dixie Electric Cooperative offers heat-pump rebates and an off-bill financing program, and allows their members to vote both in-person and by mail.
Overall score: 37/122

Franklin Electric Cooperative
Overall score: 36/122

Joe Wheeler EMC
Overall score: 50/122

Marshall-Dekalb Electric Cooperative displayed troubling financial discrepancies between their public tax documents, resulting in inability to properly score them on compensation questions.
Overall score: 15/122

North Alabama Electric Cooperative
Overall score: 38/122

Pea River Electric Cooperative is one of only three Alabama RECs to offer regular loan-based on-bill financing program and water-heater rebates.
Overall score: 19/122

Pioneer Electric Cooperative held virtual meetings during COVID to ensure accessibility.
Overall score: 45/122

Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative
Overall score: 30/122

South Alabama Electric Cooperative (SAEC) displayed troubling financial discrepancies on their public tax documents, resulting in inability to properly score them on compensation questions. SAEC is one of only three Alabama RECs to offer regular loan-based on-bill financing program.
Overall score: 19/122

Southern Pine Electric Cooperative has a Member Task Force composed of 48 couples, 12 from each of the co-op’s four service areas. Task Force membership rotates annually giving members a chance to not only learn how their co-op works, and the needs it serves, but give feedback and serve in an advisory capacity.
Overall score: 26/122

Tallapoosa River Electric Cooperative
Overall score: 21/122

Tombigbee Electric Cooperative
Overall score: 46/122

Wiregrass Electric Cooperative (WEC) offers loan programs to provide seed money to generate economic development. WEC is one of only two co-ops that has the right for members to attend board meetings (and to do so without prior written approval) written into the bylaws. WEC further shows a dedication to transparency by providing an extensive FAQ on their website. WEC has demonstrated a commitment to gender equality through bylaw amendments relating to pronouns.
Overall score: 59/122

Wiregrass Electric Cooperative serves as a positive example of what transparency and accessibility should look like. They welcome members to attend meetings, and clearly inform members of upcoming elections and proposed bylaw amendments.

Some low scores may be due to lack of information. These RECs refused or failed to respond to requests for information: Arab Electric Cooperative, Baldwin EMC, Black Warrior EMC, Central Alabama Electric Cooperative. Clarke-Washington EMC, Pea River Electric Cooperative, Sand Mountain Electric Cooperative, South Alabama Electric Cooperative, and Tallapoosa River Electric Cooperative. These RECs did provide some information requested but failed/refused to respond to other requests: Franklin Electric Cooperative, Joe Wheeler EMC, Marshall-Dekalb Electric Cooperative, and Southern Pine Electric Cooperative. Scores of zero were given when information was not available/provided to us. These failures to provide information likely resulted in lower scores than would have been earned had they provided accurate information.

VIEW THE FULL SCORECARD
There is room for improvement at all of the Alabama RECs, and we hope that this Scorecard serves to provide information to all about what improvements are possible and needed.

 

Have questions about the REC Scorecard? Drop them in the comments below.

Light Bulb 101

Energy Efficient Light Bulbs 101 – At Home

Confused by which light bulb to buy? We’ve put together a short primer to (ahem!) “shine some light” on the topic for you.

Here’s the key thing to know about light bulbs. If you buy junk, you’ll get junk. 

Quick facts:

  • It used to be that wattage of the bulb determined what you needed to buy. Not so much anymore. Lumens is what you should look for. The higher the lumens, the more light is output by the bulb.
  • Be wary of really cheap LEDs. More than likely they don’t last very long. LEDs are supposed to last well around 20 years. Cheap ones typically last for less than 10 years.
  • Only buy bulbs with an ENERGY STAR logo on them. This is the only way to know if a light bulb is truly a good purchase. In order to receive the ENERGY STAR logo, they can’t just save energy. They must be up to 90% more efficient than standard bulbs, last at least 15 times longer and save about $55 in electricity costs over their lifetime, meet strict quality and efficiency standards that are tested by accredited labs and certified by a third party, and produce about 70-90% less heat (safer to operate and can cut energy costs associated with home cooling). This is why cheap LEDs, which save energy, cannot get the ENERGY STAR logo.

So let’s get started!

Incandescent Bulbs:  These are what I call the “old-fashioned” bulbs though they are becoming less standard all the time.


Pros: They create warm light. They are also inexpensive to purchase.

Cons: They wear out quickly, use more energy, and create more heat. That means more frequent replacement (may outweigh the low sticker price) and more energy use.

Life: 800 – 1,000 hours

Cost per bulb: ~ $1 per bulb

Dimmable: Yes

Energy used: ~.06 Kilowatts (kW)

CFL-light-bulb

www.lightingandmaintenancesolutions.com


 

CFL (Compact Fluorescent Lights) Bulbs: The second generation to the humming tubes hanging in your dad’s basement workshop, these are the curly-shaped little darlings.

When we first moved away from incandescent bulbs, critics of the CFL cried ugly because they produced a cool, harsh, light with blue undertones. As technology has advanced, CFLs can be found in warmer color spectrums that are closer to the traditional incandescents.

Pros: CFLs use 75% less energy than incandescent bulbs. They also produce less heat than their incandescent counterparts (approximately half, depending on the bulb).

Cons: CFLs contain mercury. They are more expensive than standard incandescent bulbs and are arguably less attractive. Designers will not select this bulb.

Life: 6,000 – 15,000 hours

Cost per bulb: ~ $2 per bulb

Dimmable: No (dimmable options may be available for purchase)

Energy Used: ~.014 Kilowatts (kW)


LED (Light Emitting Diode): The energy superstars of the group. Depending on the brand and variety, they can last from 2 – 25 years. Put them in your teenagers’ bedrooms. You know they’re not switching them off.

Pros: LED bulbs produce less heat and last a long time. New LED bulbs can cast that warm-colored light we love. LEDs don’t break when jostled, a huge factor in busy manufacturing sites and industrial areas. Best of all, they don’t contain mercury.

Cons: LED technology is moving quickly.  Some of these bulbs still create directional light, but most newer versions disperse light better.  Lastly, LEDs do have a slightly higher upfront cost.

Life: 50,000 hours

Cost per bulb: ~$1.25 – ~$20

Dimmable: Yes (non dimmable options are available)

Energy used: ~.008 Kilowatts (kW)

Sustainable Efforts for Light Bulbs:

  • Place your lights on a dimmer. It can save up to 50% in energy costs. Remember, most CFLs and even some LEDs aren’t dimmable. You’ll need to look for and specifically buy dimmable bulbs.
  • Turn out the lights: One incandescent bulb left on 8 hours costs ~ 6 cents. 5 incandescents burning 8 hours cost ~ 30 cents which equates to $110/year. 2 porch lights, 1 kitchen light, 1 family room light, and 1 bathroom light burning. These costs can start to add up quickly.
  • Recycle:  CFLs contain mercury and all bulbs take up space in landfills. The good news is it’s easy to recycle your old bulbs. You can even bring them to your neighborhood hardware stores. Visit this site http://search.earth911.com/ and type in your zip code for recyclers near you

 

Comparison Between LED, CFL and Incandescent Light Bulbs:

 

LEDCFLIncandescent
Lifespan in hours50,0009,0001,200
Watts (equivalent 75 watts)7.51460
Cost per bulb$2$2$1
Daily cost*$0.008$0.011$0.048
Annual cost*$2.92$4.09$17.52
Cost for 50k hours$50$70.00$300.00
Bulbs needed for 50k hours1642
Total cost for 50k hours with bulb price$52.92$82.00$342.00

Source: http://energyusecalculator.com/electricity_cfllightbulb.htm

*Cost is based on $0.10/kWh, with bulb on for 8 hours per day

Conclusion:

  • Try to buy LEDs everywhere you can, but if you can’t, target your high use areas first! If you have incandescents, go ahead and replace them. If you have CFLs, wait until they die, and then upgrade.
  • LEDs have gotten extremely cheap! Off brand is perfectly fine to buy, as long as they have the ENERGY STAR logo.
  • Make sure to match lumens, not watts. Take your old bulbs with you to the store and look for the LEDs that have close to the same lumens, not watts. You may have a 60 watt incandescent only to find a 40 watt ‘equivalent’ LED is actually what you need.