Energy Alabama Wins 2016 Air Pollution Control Achievement Award

Energy Alabama was honored to win the 2016 Air Pollution Control Achievement Award (Education Category)! The award application was submitted under our legal name, Alabama Center for Sustainable Energy. We are a non-profit organization accelerating the transition to sustainable energy in Alabama.

The City of Huntsville honored us for our work in the schools to educate K-12 students about clean, sustainable energy. The use of sustainable energy has a positive impact on our air quality.

More information about the award can be found here: http://www.huntsvilleal.gov/2016-air-pollution-control-achievement-awards/

Understanding an Energy Use Index

The North Alabama Buildings Performance Challenge is an initiative to cut energy usage in our community. When you’re using ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager, you’ll be able to calculate the amount of energy your company uses by using the Energy Use Index (EUI). The main benefit of using the EUI is that you can compare your building’s performance to similar facilities across the country. By itself, an EUI is practically useless, but, when you compare it to a statistically relevant data set, it can help you understand how well you perform against your peers. This device is a good way for companies to figure out how their building’s energy usage measures up to other buildings that are similar and to help them set energy usage goals for the future.

A practical use for your EUI is to set energy goals and benchmarks. By monitoring your EUI each year and using the information that it gives you, you can set tough but achievable energy usage goals. Each month, you’ll need to enter the data from your utility bill, making it easier to track improvements over time and giving you the ability to automatically see the difference it had on your EUI.

An EUI isn’t the one and only useful device, but it’s just one of the tools afforded to you by ENERGY STAR and the North Alabama Buildings Performance Challenge. You can have an EUI in the top 25% out of similar buildings around the country, but your work space might be uncomfortable. Don’t sacrifice your employee’s work place comfort just to cut energy usage. The key is not to just reduce energy consumption but to cut the waste and still get your work done.

SIDE NOTE: There is a big difference between site EUI and source EUI. Site EUI is the type of energy use that most of us are used to; it’s the energy use that shows the amount of heat and electricity consumed. That is what is reflected in your utility bill. To see how the energy use for a building changes over time is the reason why we look at the site energy usage. Source EUI is the calculation that accounts for the entirety of energy use. It is the total amount of raw fuel that a building uses to operate, which includes the on-site energy uses.

Ready to see how the Energy Use Index can work for your company? Try it out! It’s free!

 

Energy Audit

Energy Audits: Is Your Building in Top Shape?

Cross-posted to NABPC.org

The North Alabama Buildings Performance Challenge is up and running, which means it’s time to start conserving energy. If you’ve signed up for the challenge, you’ve committed your company to attaining 20% energy savings in your building within 10 years.

Today, we’re continuing our three-part series about the primary steps that facility owners should take in order to achieve that target. By the time you finish all three posts, you should have learned a good bit of the info you’ll need to craft your energy-saving strategy.

Last time, we looked at energy benchmarking, and next time we’ll discuss commissioning. Today, though, the topic is energy audits.

An energy audit, to quote Energy.gov’s rather straightforward definition, is “a survey that shows how much energy you use in your house or apartment. It will help you find ways to use less energy.”

For our purposes, let’s just pretend they didn’t limit their explanation to houses and apartments. Whether the building is a home, business, factory, corporate headquarters or something else entirely, the concept remains the same. By giving your building an energy audit, you’ll be assessing how much energy it uses. And with that information in hand, you’ll know what measures you can take in order to use less energy and make your building more efficient.

Energy Audits vs. Benchmarking

Simple, right?Energy Audit

Now, at this point, you might be thinking that this sounds a whole lot like benchmarking, the topic of the previous entry in this series. The two concepts are indeed similar, but there’s a key difference.

Benchmarking compares your building to similar facilities in order to give you an idea of where it stands in relation to its peers. An energy audit goes one step further and sets out a plan for action.

Or, to use a fitness metaphor, benchmarking only tells you how overweight your building is. An energy audit analyzes your building’s energy usage and gives it a customized workout plan. By following the plan, you’ll whip your building into shape in no time.

Saving Money

And once your building’s energy consumption is on track, you’ll start saving money on your utility bill. How much money? According to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Challenge, our national model, most companies can easily capture 20% energy savings. When we say easily, we mean that most businesses can see these kinds of savings with minimal effort and investment.

That kind of reduction to your energy bill would set you on course to conquer the Huntsville Better Buildings Challenge. Plus, it would pretty much make you a rockstar at your company.

So, then, what does an energy audit look like?

In residential settings, weatherproofing and insulation are generally two big areas of concern. For industrial or commercial buildings, audits would be more likely to focus on production equipment, lighting or climate control. In either case, you’ll want to find a professional to conduct the audit for you.

What Will This Cost?

Of course, some of this may come at a cost. Preliminary energy audits, or PEAs, and (usually) Level I audits can be done for free if you proceed with upgrade work–or at least at a very low cost. For more detailed audits the cost will be a little higher.

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory estimates that detailed energy audits generally run between $0.12 and $0.50 per square foot. We call these Level II or Level III audits. For a great rundown on the difference between the different types of audits, check out this article from Microgrid Energy.

Depending on the size of your facility, that can amount to a serious chunk of change. But it’s not all bad news, as PNNL notes:

A convention center in a major metropolitan city reduced energy costs by almost $80,000 annually by implementing energy efficient changes to equipment, controls and system. Payback for these changes was less than a year, and facility staff predict an additional savings of $174,000 annually if longer-term equipment replacements are installed.

Those figures represent savings that virtually any company could appreciate. And it all came about because of energy auditing.

Naturally, no two auditing experiences will be exactly alike. But in almost every case, you should be able to find ways to increase efficiency–and save money.

With that, you’re ready to take the plunge with an energy audit. Up next, it’s time to talk about commission. See you then.

Energy Benchmarking

Energy Benchmarking: Does Your Building Match Up?

Cross posted from NABPC.org

The North Alabama Buildings Performance Challenge is up and running, which means it’s time to start conserving energy. If you’ve signed up for the challenge, you’ve committed your company to attaining 20% energy savings in your building within 10 years.

That’s fantastic. Hooray, you! But wait, now what?

We’re glad you asked.

Starting today, we’re running a three-part series about the primary steps that facility owners should take in order to achieve that target. By the time you finish all three posts, you should have learned all the info you’ll need to start crafting your energy-saving strategy.

Ready? Let’s get started. Our next two posts will cover energy audits and commissioning, but today, our topic is energy benchmarking.

Energy benchmarking, to give you a five-second definition, is the process of measuring how much energy a building consumes, and then comparing it to the same data from similar structures across the country. In other words, it’s a simple way for owners to see how efficiently–or inefficiently–their buildings are performing.

The process is part of the federal government’s ENERGY STAR program, and if you do well enough, your building will earn ENERGY STAR certification. But that’s for later. For now, you’ll need to figure out where to start.

Energy Benchmarking: First Steps

To do that, all you need is some basic information about your facility. Based on what type of building you have, you’ll use one of three specialized tools, all of which are available at EnergyStar.gov. Commercial buildings utilize the Portfolio Manager, while industrial plants need the Energy Tracking Tool. (There are actually 80 types of buildings in the Commercial category. You can see the full list, as well as the information needed for Portfolio Manager, here.) For new construction, there’s the Target Finder.

Once you’ve figured that out, you’ll be ready to benchmark. Based on how well your facility performs, you’ll receive a score anywhere between 1 and 100, with 100 being the best possible rating. A score of 50 is average, and anything over 75 will earn you ENERGY STAR certification.

Keep in mind, however, that not every building type is eligible for an ENERGY STAR score. (To find out what types are eligible, click here.) That said, the vast majority of property types do provide an Energy Use Index (EUI) reference.

What Next?

As you can see, there’s plenty of data out there, so benchmarking should give you a pretty good idea of where you stand in comparison to your peers. The news might be good or bad, but at least you’ll know. A wise man once said knowing is half the battle, and he was right. Once you’ve made that all-important discovery, you’ll be able to take action.

Oh, and another thing. Just because you’ve gone through the benchmarking process once, that doesn’t mean you’re finished forever. Actually, it’s the opposite. From EnergyStar.gov:

Benchmarking works best when it’s done consistently over time. Can you imagine a weight-loss plan in which you only weigh yourself once a year? Of course you can’t. That’s because you can’t manage what you’re not measuring.

In a recent study, EPA found that buildings that were benchmarked consistently reduced energy use by an average of 2.4 percent per year, for a total savings of 7 percent. And, buildings that started out as poor performers saved even more. See EPA’s Portfolio Manager DataTrends series for more information.

That’s why benchmarking is important, and why you should be doing it consistently. Once you have the information about your building, you should have some idea where to make improvements. And if you keep benchmarking year after year, you’ll continue to save money on energy costs.

Taking Action

Now that you know, it’s time to take action. If you’re interested, the process is as easy as it is accessible.

A couple months back, Energy Alabama and CEO Daniel Tait held a “benchmarking jam” session at a local brewery. Besides sampling some craft beer, energy experts and business leaders discussed ways to maximize energy and water efficiency throughout the community. To take part in the jam, the business reps only had to bring the following:

  • Laptop or tablet
  • The building street address, year built, and contact information.
  • Twelve consecutive months of utility bills for all fuel types used in the building.

That was enough to get the ball rolling. And from there, the path runs straight toward evaluating your building and saving money on your energy bill. More energy benchmarking events are in the pipeline, but you don’t even have to wait. If you’re ready to begin the process now, contact Energy Alabama CEO Daniel Tait for more information.

Easy as it is, energy benchmarking isn’t the only step toward conquering the Huntsville Better Buildings Challenge. Next time, we’ll look at implementing what an energy audit can do for you.

Electric cars more appealing as gas shortage conversation continues

HUNTSVILLE, Ala.– It’s National Drive Electric week, and the timing couldn’t be better. With the recent oil spill issues and gas shortage conversations, more people might be looking toward electric cars as another viable option. Energy Alabama hosted an event at the Whole Foods Saturday where people could come and test electric cars.

To continue reading the full article, please visit: http://whnt.com/2016/09/17/electric-cars-more-appealing-as-gas-shortage-conversation-continues/