Julie Ryan

Energy Saving Hacks - use a programmable thermostat

10 Home Energy Saving Hacks

We don’t want you to get the wrong idea. Going solar is NOT the only way to save energy!

We know that many of you have seen amazing energy (and money) savings with some simple changes around your home or business. Heck, Randy at Avion Solutions saved over 41% on their energy bills by simply becoming aware of the tools at their disposal and learning how to use them.

Avion saved another 11% by changing out their light bulbs. Now that’s a simple change that anyone can do!  We’ve talked to a number of you who have seen massive savings just by converting your lighting to LED. Of course, you don’t have to go LED to save a massive amount of money. Even switching to CFL bulbs can save you 75% over traditional light bulbs. That being said, most LEDs are now just as cheap if not cheaper than CFLs!

So, that gave us an idea, why not share with you some simple energy-saving hacks that anyone can do, and that don’t require a massive investment.

  • Use Power Strips – All those electronics in your home continue to use power even when they are in standby mode. Just because your laptop is asleep doesn’t mean it isn’t sucking power. So, instead of just letting your electronics sleep when you aren’t using them, how about using a powerstrip to shut the power off to the devices. Instead of trying to remember to unplug all your devices you can simply flip the power strip to off and stop wasting all that energy.
  • Energy Saving Hacks: Install a bi-directional ceiling fanRun Ceiling Fans Backwards – Did you know that most ceiling fans will run in two directions? There’s a reason for that and it’s quite simple. When the weather is warm you want your ceiling fan to run counter-clockwise to pull warm air up and create a nice breeze. But, don’t just turn the fan off in the winter, flip the switch so that it runs clockwise and pushes the warm air down into the room.  This can help save a bundle on energy.
  • Wash Clothes in Cold Water – We know it’s not the first time you’ve read this tip from us, and it may not be the last. Probably because washing your clothes in cold water instead of warm not only saves a bundle on energy but it also makes your clothes last longer and saves you even more money in the long run.
  • Pack Your Freezer Tight – If you have a standalone freezer there’s a good chance it’s not full to the brim and if it’s not, then it’s using more energy than it should. We’re not saying you should run out and buy a bunch of extra food to store, but you can (and should) pack it full with bags of ice. When your freezer is full the frozen foods help keep the air cool meaning that the freezer doesn’t have to work as hard to stay cold. Another benefit is that if we have a major power outage your food will last a lot longer before it starts to thaw.
  • Install and adjustable thermostat – If you are still using one of those old-fashioned thermostats that does nothing more than set a temperature, you are seriously wasting money. Adjustable thermostats are fairly inexpensive and can have a huge influence on your electric bill. An adjustable thermostat allows you to set the temperature based on the time of the day. So, if you prefer it cooler overnight the thermostat will automatically adjust. There are even adjustable thermostats that learn your household patterns and adjust the temperature automatically.
  • Caulk and seal your windows and doors – proper weather-stripping will help your home hold in heat (or cool) and better maintain your preferred temperature. This means that your HVAC system won’t have to work nearly as hard. This is one of those fixes that takes a little bit of work, but pays off in a huge way.
  • Choose filters wisely – More and more of us have switched over to those accordion-style HVAC filters. But, did you know that those filters actually reduce the airflow through your vents?  For better HVAC efficiency you are better off using the older style filters. They also happen to be a lot cheaper.
  • Change your filters – Remember that your HVAC filters should be changed about once a month. The accordion-style filters suggest longer intervals, which is one reason many people have opted for them. However, you can use the cheaper filters and change them three times as often and actually save yourself some money and energy.
  • Wash dishes wisely – Make sure to run your dishwasher when it’s full. This energy-efficient choice is actually a better choice than washing dishes by hand (and a heck of a lot easier!).
  • Get a Home Energy Audit – If you really want to know where your home is losing energy, have someone come out and do a free Home Energy Audit. They will tell you exactly where your home is losing energy and how to fix it. This is probably the most cost-efficient tip we can give you!

Got more energy-saving hacks? Share them in the comments below. We want to hear what you do to cut your energy use and costs.

biofuels

Pros and Cons of Bioenergy

A while back I shared with you a primer on the world’s oldest source of energy – bioenergy. As a reminder, Bioenergy refers to the process of “efficiently extracting considerable quantities of clean, low-emission electricity from waste.” The waste used as a fuel source is usually agricultural, forestry and municipal wastes, with sugar cane waste (“bagasse”) being the most commonly used source.

Today, I want to look a little deeper at the pros and cons of bioenergy.

Pros


  • Bioenergy a reliable source of renewable energy.  We will never have a shortage of waste that can be converted to energy. As long as there is garbage, manure, and crops there will be biomass to create bioenergy.
  • Bioenergy can be stored with little energy loss.
  • As long as there is agriculture there will be a constant energy source.
  • Bioenergy emits little or no greenhouse gas emissions and is carbon neutral. The carbon that is created by biomass is reabsorbed by the next crop of plants.
  • Bioenergy doubles as a waste disposal measure.
  • Bioenergy crops help stabilize soils, improve soil fertility, and reduces erosion.
  • Bioenergy is a source of clean energy, the use of which can result in tax credits from the US government.
  • Bioenergy reduces the need for landfills
  • Typically, Bioenergy plants are dispatchable, meaning they can easily be turned on or off. This allows more flexibility for electricity grid operators to respond to times of peak demand.

 

Cons


  • Using wood from natural forests can lead to deforestation if the forests are not replanted.
  • The cost of harvesting, transporting, and handling biomass can be expensive.
  • Storing and processing of biomass requires large amounts of space.
  • Some fuel sources are seasonal.
  • May compete with food production in specific cases.
  • Bioenergy plants have a large footprint and require a lot of space, limiting the location options.
  • Some renewable energies, like solar power, are significantly more land-efficient.
  • Bioenergy production typically creates liquid fuels like ethanol or biodiesel that can then be used in applications like combustion engines. However, electric motors can be 2–3 times more efficient than internal combustion engines, which makes bioenergy much less productive in terms of energy for vehicle transport.

As with every energy source there are pros and cons, but as you can see the pros for bioenergy definitely outweigh the cons, especially when compared to fossil fuels.  Bioenergy should be included as part of our larger energy picture that includes all types of renewable energy including solar and wind energy.

Bioenergy is best when it is created using waste materials. These are materials that are by-products of agriculture and farming, downed trees, and our garbage and waste that would be left rotting in a landfill. These waste materials can create valuable energy at a relatively low cost and using these for energy reduces the need for landfills and helps preserve our surroundings while creating another source of power.

 

 

Sources:

  1. Clean Energy Council 2012, Bioenergy myths and facts, Clean Energy Council, Melbourne.
  2. Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, Waste-to-Energy, US Department of Energy, Washington D.C.
  3. Searchinger, T. and R. Heimlich. 2015, Avoiding Bioenergy Competition for Food Crops and Land. World Resources Institute, Washington D.C.
  4. Lynskey, Rachel, et al. ClimateWorks Australia, 2020, Moving to Zero: Accelerating the Transition to Zero-Emissions Transport. Monash Sustainable Development Institute, Australia.
10 ways to make your home more energy efficient

10 Ways to Increase Energy Efficiency

What is Energy Efficiency?

We talk a lot about energy efficiency around here. It’s one of our core values because we can’t reach net zero without it. But, what is energy efficiency? What does it even mean?

Energy efficiency is doing the same things you always do, but using less energy to do them. Remember when you were a kid and you’d leave the front (or back) door open and mom would yell at you and ask if you were raised in a barn? The next thing out her mouth would be something about heating (or cooling) the outdoors. Yeah, well when you heating or cooling the outdoors you are not making the best use of your energy.

Energy efficiency means that you are optimally using the energy in your home and not wasting it. You don’t have air leaking out windows, you aren’t leaving doors open, and you don’t have cold air seeping into the house through wall sockets and unsealed duct work. When your home is energy-efficient you aren’t wasting money on your electric bill, you are using exactly what you need and no more.

Before we can bother with doing things like installing solar, we’ve got to make sure the building is energy-efficient. It’s a huge waste to install solar when so much of the energy you are creating is escaping the building it’s being created for.

Ever since ENERGY STAR became such a big deal it seems like most people think that that’s the core of energy efficiency, and yes ENERGY STAR appliances are much more efficient than their counterparts. But, the truth is that energy efficiency is so much simpler. There are ton of small ways that we can improve the energy efficiency in our homes and commercial buildings.

10 Ways to Increase Energy Efficiency

  1. Seal your duct work. Buy a tub of duct sealant and make sure that your duct work is sealed, this includes the ducts under your home as well as where they come into your home (the vents). While it may not seem like a big deal, a lot of air can escape through those tiny cracks between the floor and the ducts.
  2. Check your faucets for leaks. A leak left unattended can cost you big time on your water bill. Too often we don’t even realize that there is a leak until it’s too late, and often months have passed with increased electric bills. Keep an eye on your electric bill if you notice a large increase in water or electric usage there may be a problem.
  3. Insulate your water heater and pipes. If you are like many of us your water heater is in your uninsulated garage, but you don’t have to insulate your entire garage to insulate your water heater. You can purchase a water heater jacket for a minimal price and install it yourself, not only reducing the energy the unit has to use to heat your water, but it will decrease the time it takes for hot water to reach other areas of your home.
  4. Install a programmable thermostat. Whether you go with a basic unit or one of the new fancy thermostats that programs itself based on your actions, a programmable thermostat will not only save you money but will keep your home much more comfortable.
  5. Wash your laundry in cold water. Your clothes will be just as clean, but you’ll save a ton of energy that is wasted just to heat the water.
  6. Swap out light bulbs. I bet if you take a look around your house you will find that you still have some old incandescent bulbs stealing energy. Swap those old bulbs out for new LED and CFL bulbs. These bulbs use as little as 1/10 of the energy of the old bulbs and put as just as much (or more) light.
  7. Replace appliances before they die. Chances are your appliances are close to 10 years old. If you are still using old non-Energy Star appliances consider replacing them with more efficient appliances before they die. You’ll not only save energy (and money) in the long-term but you’ll save yourself from the short-term headache of having to rush out and replace a dead unit.
  8. Clean and replace filters. Check your air filters and replace them on a regular schedule.
  9. Check the humidity. If you struggle with keeping your home cool enough in the warmer months you may want to check the humidity. A $10 humidistat will allow you to see the indoor humidity. If it’s too high you’ll want to purchase and install a dehumidifier. Doing this will reduce your cooling bills and make your home much more comfortable.
  10. Caulk leaky windows – use rope caulk to caulk those leaky windows. Did you know you are losing a ton of energy to leaky windows (even if they are new)? Those little cracks can equate to having a window (or even two) open as wide as they will go.

 

It doesn’t seem like much, and these are just a few of the many easy things you can do around your house to save energy and save money.  Feel free to leave a comment and tell us what you’ve done to improve energy efficiency around your home or office.

What is Bioenergy?

What is Bioenergy?

Bioenergy is energy that comes from renewable biological sources. These sources can be any form of organic matter that stores sunlight as chemical energy. Typical sources include manure, wood pulp, and sugarcane. Although, many more sources are available and currently being researched.

The oldest form of biofuel is wood, typically used for heat. Biofuel is just another name for bioenergy. The sources of biofuel (manure, wood pulp, etc) are called biomass, while the actual biofuel (or bioenergy) is the energy that is extracted from the biomass.

The great thing about bioenergy is that the biomass is typically a by-product of some other agricultural activity. While some crops (including corn, soybeans, and sugarcane) are being grown specifically for biofuel, in many cases are simply using byproducts and waste that would not otherwise be used. Rather than throwing wood pulp or manure on the ground to decompose, we are using that wood pulp to make fuel. The great thing about this is that there is little to no competition between the biofuel sources and needed food sources.

The methane gas that is produced by rotting garbage, human waste, excess crops, and even leftover vegetable oil can be converted to useable biofuel in the forms of ethanol and biodiesel. Not only can we produce fuel for vehicles but in some countries biogas has become a primary source of electricity.

In the US, the DOE is currently researching algae as a great source of bioenergy and biofuel. Oil extracted from algae is processed and converted to fuels that we could use to operate vehicles. Algae takes CO2 out of the atmosphere, which is good for the environment and can eventually reduce our reliance on non-renewable oil sources.

Biomass generates the same amount of energy as non-renewable sources, but because it is renewable it is easily replaced. Biomass creates net zero emissions as long as new plants are being grown to replace those that are being used.

But what about the price?

The DOE has been working to not only find new sources of biomass, but to reduce the cost of biofuels. The DOE reports that once biomass production reaches commercial levels the price will be equivalent to gasoline.