Julie Ryan

Press Release: TVA Office of Inspector General Urged to Begin Formal Investigation

For Immediate Release, May 26, 2021

Contact:Daniel Tait, Energy Alabama, (256) 812-1431dtait@alcse.org
Gaby Sarri-Tobar, Center for Biological Diversity, (202) 594-7271gsarritobar@biologicaldiversity.org
Brianna Knisley, Appalachian Voices, (937) 725-0645brianna@appvoices.org
Amy Rawe, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, (865) 235-1448amyr@cleanenergy.org

Documents: TVA Used $3M in Ratepayer Money to Fund Anti-Clean Energy Efforts

Office of Inspector General Urged to Begin Formal Investigation

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.— Four nonprofit organizations called today for a federal investigation of newly uncovered records showing that the Tennessee Valley Authority used $3 million of ratepayer money to fund litigation and lobbying efforts by organizations that fight the EPA’s Clean Air Act rules. TVA is the largest public energy provider in the United States.

Today’s letter from Energy Alabama, the Center for Biological Diversity, Appalachian Voices and Southern Alliance for Clean Energy urged TVA’s Office of the Inspector General to begin a formal investigation to determine if the utility violated its board-approved policies.

Documents obtained recently through a Freedom of Information Act Request show that between 2015 and 2018, TVA staff spent more than $3 million in customer money on legal fees to the Utility Air Regulatory Group. The UARG is known for lobbying against science-based air pollution and climate regulation.

“Customers throughout the Tennessee Valley have been forced to pay for one arm of the federal government to take legal action against another arm of the federal government,” said Daniel Tait, chief operating officer of Energy Alabama. “It’s asinine and TVA would be better served investing in carbon-free technology like energy efficiency and renewable energy.”

“Rather than leading the way in cleaning up the energy sector, TVA is funding outside organizations actively fighting the renewable energy transition,” said Gaby Sarri-Tobar, energy justice campaigner in the Center’s Energy Justice program. “We call on TVA’s inspector general to ensure that the nation’s largest public energy provider stops abusing ratepayer funds in this manner.”

Last year, Energy Alabama, the Center, Appalachian Voices and others demanded that TVA stop giving millions of dollars in ratepayer money to the same groups at issue here. The rulemaking petition detailed that TVA is violating its customers’ First Amendment rights by compelling them to fund this work against the interest of Tennessee Valley communities. But this funding stream continues.

“Workers who cleaned up the Kingston spill in 2008 are still suffering and dying from their exposure to TVA’s toxic coal ash,” said Bri Knisley, Tennessee campaign coordinator at Appalachian Voices. “It’s shameful that after more than a decade of this suffering, TVA chose to spend more than $3 million of ratepayer money to fund a group that fights policies that protect our clean air and public health.”

“When the people of the Tennessee Valley pay their electric bills, they do not expect the utility to use their money to fight environmental regulations. And yet that is what TVA has done,” said Maggie Shober, director of utility reform at Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. “This is a breach of the regulatory compact that allows utilities their monopoly. Without the ability to switch to another provider, TVA customers are stuck paying for this unethical use of funds. It is even more egregious considering TVA is a part of the very federal government it is lobbying or litigating against.”

Last month, TVA CEO and President Jeff J. Lyash said he plans to decarbonize TVA by 2050, but he did not explain how TVA would achieve that nonbinding goal. Like other major utilities, TVA still depends heavily on fossil fuels. Even with this new goal, the utility plans to continue to build new fracked gas plants, relying on false solutions that will worsen climate injustice in the Tennessee Valley.

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 1.7 million members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

Energy Alabama is a membership-based nonprofit organization accelerating Alabama’s transition to sustainable energy. We accomplish our mission by educating at all levels, informing smart energy policy, building the next generation workforce, and providing technical assistance to deploy more sustainable energy. We believe in sustainable energy for all.

Appalachian Voices works at the nexus of the ongoing shift from fossil fuels to clean, 21st-century energy sources — we fight mountaintop-removal coal mining, fracked-gas pipelines and other harms to the people and places of Appalachia, and we advance energy efficiency, solar and wind power, and other economic solutions that create community wealth and sustain Appalachia’s mountains, forests and waters.

Since 1985, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy has worked to promote responsible and equitable energy choices to ensure clean, safe, and healthy communities throughout the Southeast. Learn more at www.cleanenergy.org.

Press Release: Tennessee Valley Authority Must Commit to 100% Clean Energy, Align With Biden Climate Goal

For Immediate Release, February 9, 2021

Contact:Gaby Sarri-Tobar, Center for Biological Diversity, (202) 594-7271, gsarritobar@biologicaldiversity.org
Daniel Tait, Energy Alabama, (256) 812-1431, dtait@alcse.org
Brianna Knisley, Appalachian Voices, (937) 725-0645, brianna@appvoices.org

Tennessee Valley Authority Must Commit to 100% Clean Energy, Align With Biden Climate Goal

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.— The federally owned Tennessee Valley Authority must align its energy planning with President Biden’s recent executive order requiring that the federal electricity sector completely decarbonize by 2035, energy justice groups said today in a letter to the public utility’s board of directors.

“TVA must change course immediately to address the climate emergency and meet President Biden’s urgent call to action,” said Gaby Sarri-Tobar, energy justice campaigner at the Center for Biological Diversity. “TVA’s electricity plans show no urgency to cut emissions, phase out poisonous fossil fuels, or diminish the unbearable energy burden felt by its customers, many of whom are Black and low-wealth. TVA board members are defying the president and worsening the climate crisis by failing to act.”

In advance of the board’s Feb. 11 meeting, the Center, Energy Alabama, Appalachian Voices and 10 other organizations demanded that the TVA board immediately commit to 100% clean and renewable energy by 2030.

“The TVA board has lost sight of its New Deal era roots and TVA’s prioritization of expensive and unnecessary coal and gas are threatening the very existence of the agency right when we need its bold action the most,” said Daniel Tait, chief operating officer of Energy Alabama. “TVA once led the country on clean energy development and earned its place as the nation’s iconic federal utility. It’s well past time for TVA to again set the federal example and get back to work for everyone in the Valley.”

TVA generates just 4% of electricity from solar, wind and energy efficiency. The utility plans to emit more than 34 million tons of carbon dioxide a year by 2038, according to its own projections. TVA is set to retire less than a quarter of its current coal fleet by 2030, and just this month announced plans to expand fossil fuel operations at two dirty gas plants.

“TVA should be modeling a rapid transition to zero carbon energy that also centers its union workforce. Instead, TVA continues to make expensive, dirty decisions, and now several local power companies are seeking a cheaper power provider, which may jeopardize jobs for our local unions,” said Brianna Knisley, Appalachian Voices’ Tennessee campaign coordinator. “Instead of making decisions that harm our environment and drive up energy costs, TVA should follow Biden’s executive orders and invest in clean and efficient projects that will bring energy equity and green job growth to the Valley.”

TVA’s actions jeopardize the utility’s long-term outlook as local power companies face rate spikes and diminished access to cheaper, cleaner energy. The Center recently intervened in a complaint filed by local power companies dissatisfied that TVA is blocking them from purchasing cheaper power from other suppliers. The companies are asking FERC to let them defect.

Last week Biden removed former President Trump’s nominations to the TVA board, so Biden will have four opportunities this spring to appoint clean-energy champions.

TVA is a federally owned corporation and the nation’s largest public power provider. It generates electricity for more than 9 million customers in Tennessee, northern Alabama, northeastern Mississippi, southwestern Kentucky, and portions of northern Georgia, western North Carolina and southwestern Virginia.

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 1.7 million members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

Energy Alabama is a membership-based nonprofit organization accelerating Alabama’s transition to sustainable energy. We accomplish our mission by educating at all levels, informing smart energy policy, building the next generation workforce, and providing technical assistance to deploy more sustainable energy. We believe in sustainable energy for all.

Appalachian Voices works at the nexus of the ongoing shift from fossil fuels to clean, 21st-century energy sources — we fight mountaintop-removal coal mining, fracked-gas pipelines and other harms to the people and places of Appalachia, and we advance energy efficiency, solar and wind power, and other economic solutions that create community wealth and sustain Appalachia’s mountains, forests and waters.

 

 

Energy Alabama, GASP Appeal Alabama PSC’s Approval of $1+ Billion Gas Expansion

Groups Appeal Alabama Public Service Commission’s Approval of $1+ Billion Gas Expansion 

For Immediate Release: January 11, 2021

Montgomery, AL—Energy Alabama, GASP, and the Southern Environmental Law Center are appealing the Public Service Commission’s approval of Alabama Power’s petition for its single largest capacity increase ever, with a price tag for customers of over $1.1 billion.

The groups have filed an appeal in state court challenging the Commission’s decision allowing Alabama Power to increase its natural gas capacity by over 1800 megawatts, including building a new gas plant at the Barry Electric Generating Plant in Mobile County, while failing to approve a proposal to add 400 megawatts of solar plus battery energy storage projects.

In September, the groups petitioned the Commission to reconsider its determination that this capacity increase is needed, especially in light of the economic slowdown caused by the pandemic; its decision to saddle customers instead of utility shareholders with the risk that the assets will become stranded; and its denial of the solar plus storage projects, which the utility’s own analysis showed had the most value for customers. The Commission denied the petition.

Starting January 1, Alabama Power’s electric rates are increasing for all 1.48 million residential, commercial, and industrial customers, raising the average residential monthly bill by about $4. As a result of the new natural gas capacity, bills are expected to increase further starting in 2023.

“Alabamians already pay some of the highest energy bills in the country and the pandemic has only worsened the financial hardships many are facing,” said Keith Johnston, Director of SELC’s Birmingham office. “Now the Commission is allowing Alabama Power to go forward with an unjustified, massive amount of new capacity that will further increase electricity rates, putting added strain on customers.”

The Alabama Attorney General’s office raised concerns in the Commission proceedings that the proposed gas plants could become stranded or uneconomic as a result of new emission standards or changes in technology, and recommended that the Commission impose a condition requiring that Alabama Power and its shareholders bear any stranded costs associated with its proposal instead of customers.

In its final order, the Commission ignored the Attorney General’s recommendation and failed to set any conditions on its approval, concluding it would be “inequitable” to burden Alabama Power shareholders with stranded asset risk, even though shareholders reap substantial profits from self-build assets like Barry Unit 8.

“The Commission failed to act in the public interest by approving unnecessary, expensive projects while leaving more affordable options on the table,” said Daniel Tait, Chief Operating Officer of Energy Alabama. “To make matters worse, the Commission has rubberstamped an enormous transfer of risk from utility shareholders to customers.”

Alabama remains the only state in the Southern Company territory, which includes Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi, that prevents the public from any meaningful participation in the energy planning process.

“Alabamians deserve to have an open and transparent regulatory process, more information around how their energy decisions are being made, and the opportunity to provide input to ensure decisions are made in our state’s best interest,” said Michael Hansen, Executive Director of GASP. “When that transparency is missing from the energy decision-making process, we end up with unjust results where utility profits are given priority over people.”

 

Background:

In early March 2020 the Alabama Public Service Commission heard testimony from 15 witnesses concerning Alabama Power’s request to increase its total power-producing capabilities by almost 20%, despite the utility’s previous assertions that it wouldn’t need new electric generation sources until 2035.

On behalf of Energy Alabama and GASP, the Southern Environmental Law Center intervened in the docket to advocate for responsible, cost-effective investments to meet any need for additional capacity on Alabama Power’s system.

Energy Alabama and GASP’s experts exposed significant flaws in the planning and forecasting methods Alabama Power used to justify its claimed need. In written and oral testimony, the experts pointed to the utility’s long-standing efforts to profit from unnecessary and expensive new generation assets that increase costs for customers.

The groups also made the case that Alabama Power’s plan lacks significant detail about the cheapest, least cost resources, such as solar and energy efficiency.  Alabama Power’s own analysis showed that solar plus battery storage are the least cost resources in its proposal and provide more value to customers.

Energy Alabama and GASP’s proposed order details their position based on the record developed during the hearing.

The groups also filed a motion for permission to file supplemental briefing regarding how the Covid-19 pandemic may impact the need for and timing of the resources proposed in Alabama Power’s petition. These issues were not addressed during the March hearings, which was limited to testimony filed long before the pandemic took hold.

Energy Alabama and GASP filed a supplemental brief arguing that the Commission should not rush forward with a decision without fully assessing the pandemic’s impacts and resulting economic fallout on the utility’s petition.

Following the PSC staff’s recommendations to approve the majority of projects that Alabama Power is seeking to build, buy or contract, the Commission voted unanimously in June 2020 to adopt the staff recommendations in their entirety.

The only resources the Commission refused to approve were the proposals for solar plus battery storage, by far the most economic options according to Alabama Power’s own analysis.  Instead, the Commissioners signed off on the staff’s recommendation to evaluate the solar and battery proposals in another existing docket. The Commission issued a final order in August.

GASP and Energy Alabama filed a petition for reconsideration and rehearing in September, urging the Commission to reconsider Alabama Power’s need determination and to grant a rehearing to consider updated testimony in light of the changed circumstances resulting in lessened electric demand. The Commission denied the groups’ motion for reconsideration and rehearing in December.

###

 

About Energy Alabama:

Energy Alabama is a membership-based non-profit organization accelerating Alabama’s transition to sustainable energy. We accomplish our mission by educating at all levels, informing smart energy policy, building the next generation workforce, and providing technical assistance to deploy more sustainable energy. We believe in sustainable energy for all. energyalabama.org

 

About GASP: GASP is a nonprofit health advocacy organization based in Birmingham, Ala. Our mission is to advance healthy air and environmental justice in the greater-Birmingham area through education, advocacy, and collaboration. We strive to reduce exposure to air pollution, educate the public on the health risks associated with poor air quality, and encourage community leaders to serve as role models by advocating for clean air and clean energy. GASPgroup.org

 

About Southern Environmental Law Center: For more than 30 years, the Southern Environmental Law Center has used the power of the law to champion the environment of the Southeast. With over 80 attorneys and nine offices across the region, SELC is widely recognized as the Southeast’s foremost environmental organization and regional leader. SELC works on a full range of environmental issues to protect our natural resources and the health and well-being of all the people in our region. www.SouthernEnvironment.org


TAKE ACTION NOW - STAND WITH US

Join us as we fight Alabama Power's unneeded natural gas expansion

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TVA sign at Hyde Park, NY, By Billy Hathorn - Own work, CC0

The History of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

The History of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

TVA’s history is really interesting, especially given how much things have changed from its original mission. TVA was established in 1933 as part of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal. TVA was created for economic development and environmental conservation. And yes, energy too. 

TVA was created not just to help electrify the south. TVA was tasked with modernizing the Tennessee Valley, one of the most impoverished regions of the country. Goals included improving the navigability of the Tennessee River, providing flood control, and developing agriculture, industry, and commerce in the seven-state area of the Tennessee Valley. Along with providing electricity to many rural areas for the first time, TVA would also bring jobs and economic development.

TVA played a major role in the World War II effort, especially making fertilizer. For decades, TVA was progressive,open to unions, and was responsible for some of the earliest movements in the South for desegregating and opening the workforce to everyone. They really pushed the envelope from an environmental, economic, and social justice perspective long before it was accepted in much of the South. That’s not to say TVA was without issues that can be papered over. The creation of TVA dams displaced thousands of families, taking an especially difficult toll on black communities.

Because it was a public utility, TVA could typically generate power at lower costs than investor owned utilities, which are usually more concerned with shareholders rather than the local community.

The Transition Away from Public Power Values

The TVA is now the largest public utility and one of the largest providers of power in the country. Unfortunately, in recent decades TVA has transitioned from operating as a public utility to operating much more like a private investor-owned utility, with a CEO that makes $8.61 milion/year. CEO Jeffrey Lyash’s high salary has drawn the ire of President Donald Trump. 

Why has TVA moved away from public power values? Some place the blame as far back as President Reagan, whose conflict with TVA appears to have stemmed from the early 1960s. Reagan had called for the privatization of TVA.

Some place the blame at the feet of the previous CEO, Bill Johnson. Johnson had a background in investor-owned utilities, rather than public power, and instituted many policies from private business. Those policies have resulted in the lack of transparency and many of the problems that we see today.

Regardless of the specific date, TVA has been on a decades long march away from the values of public power. 

The Problems with TVA

As we at Energy Alabama see it there are several major issues with the TVA. While they don’t all have easy answers, TVA can and should improve the situation.

Lack of transparency and public input

Given that TVA is a public utility, it is surprising the public has very little say in what they do. While they do provide occasional opportunities for the public to speak on specific topics, the public is largely ignored. We at Energy Alabama, as well as other great groups from around Valley, make every effort to speak out and publicly comment as much as possible. However, TVA tends to follow the typical federal rule-making process. They create a plan, collect public comments, then follow-up by telling the public how they already addressed the public’s concerns in their plan (whether they have or not).

TVA is a member of the Utility Air Regulation Group (UARG) and Utility Solid Waste Activities Group (USWAG), off the books collaboration of utilities that sue the EPA, DOE, and federal government to roll back and destroy environmental regulations. TVA uses public money (that means money from your electric bill) to fund these groups to fight the regulations that they are subject to. Basically, a federal agency using our money to sue another federal agency. 

Apparently, this has been happening despite being against the directives of the board of directors. The board had written a policy about how the TVA is supposed to use public money when it comes to lobbying and litigation, but UARG and USWAG expenditures seem to be in complete contradiction to that. They are spending our money against the public benefit; and in many cases, it appears the board doesn’t even know what’s happening.

TVA has gotten really good over the last few years of going through the motion of accepting public comments. They make sure that people like us, their customers, have the opportunity to speak up, but have no real intent of doing anything with the feedback. Basically, they will say just enough to placate and give the appearance that we’ve been heard. We, for one, cannot remember a time in which public comments we sent in to TVA were adopted or addressed substantively.

Equity and Justice

Persistent poverty is a problem in the Tennessee Valley. TVA was created to bring people out of poverty and alleviate it, not make it worse. But there are so many places in the valley where we have completely unsustainable electric bills. Those high, unsustainable electric bills only serve to keep people in these areas in poverty. 

There is no focus from the TVA on helping people save energy. In fact, TVA recently cut almost all its funding for energy efficiency and its new long-range planning magically says energy efficiency is not cost-effective. After years of pressure, TVA has run limited pilots for low-income energy efficiency but it has yet to expand these across the Valley at the scale needed. As usual, they look good on a press release but fail to fully address the problem.

By helping people solve the issue of high electric bills at the source, and fix these issues for people first, we can work towards solving the larger issues.

Customers are paying high electric bills for three main reasons.

We are paying for uncontrolled high consumption. Electric use is high in the Tennessee Valley for natural reasons. We have warmer weather which increases the need for air conditioning in the summer and when heat is needed, we are more likely to use electric heat. TVA has been historically woeful on helping people lower their consumption. In fact, they take steps to ensure that we use more energy instead of less.

We are paying for bad decisions of the past. TVA was built to create affordable energy for the people. However, unwise decisions made in the 1970s and 1980s created an undue burden on the ratepayers that will exist for many years to come.

In the early 1970’s the TVA began building 17 nuclear facilities to meet increased power demands. However, after several years the build-out for 10 of those reactors was cancelled due to lack of need. Unfortunately, the costs had already been largely incurred and continue to be passed on to the customers.

So, we now have billions of debt on the books for power plants that were never finished. That debt gets passed to the customers in the form of higher utility bills.

We are paying to maintain uneconomic power plants. Many existing coal and gas power plants around the country are losing money. Some of these are running despite a lack of need, and those that are needed could be replaced by efficient energy sources, such as solar and wind.

Despite this, TVA wants to add even more unneeded natural gas!

 

Communities in Transition

Attention also needs to be paid to how we deal with communities in transition. In areas where there were coal plants that are closed/closing, or areas where TVA has simply decided to outsource jobs. How do we take care of those people and make sure they are not hurt in this transition? This energy transition needs to take place but we need to make sure people aren’t hurt in the process. When people are being hurt, we can’t be surprised when they are resistant to the transition that needs to take place.

If we fix the problems that would help people the most, it would be easier for other things to fall into place after that. If policies are centered around people then our priorities will be in the right place.

TVA has little to no published information or planning about helping communities in transition. Will it be retraining workers? Will TVA and local power companies build renewable energy and invest in local energy efficiency in these communities? By now, you probably know the answer to date. 

 

TVA’s Lack of Ambition Regarding Renewable Energy

We’ve seen a lack of ambition from TVA regarding moving towards renewable energy, or any focus on energy storage and electric transportation. You’d think that electric companies would be out hawking electric cars as it would generate more revenue for them under the current structure. Much as they did with refrigerators and appliances in the 1940’s. However, what we’ve seen from TVA is the opposite. Their efforts seem focused on removing incentives for renewable energy and largely standing on the sidelines of the electrification discussion.

TVA’s Green Power Providers Program, launched in 2003, allowed regular people and businesses to sell excess energy from solar/renewable energy at a predefined rate. When it launched it was one of the most progressive programs in the country. It was very aggressive and provided above retail rates for renewable energy sources to stimulate economic growth. There was always an intention that those rates wouldn’t continue forever, and over the years the price of their buyback went down to around retail rates as expected.

Along the way, however, TVA decided distributed generation was a threat, not an economic driver. They got more aggressive and slashed the buyback below retail and then took it even further, paying a fraction of retail. What started as a reasonable reduction of the buyback rate, turned into a way for TVA to gut competition to their monopoly. Gutting buyback rates to the point where there was no economic incentive to participate; so, no one wanted to participate. When no one participates in a flawed program they had the justification to kill the program instead of just fixing it. While this was all happening, they were also trying to raise grid access fees (charging people more to even connect to the grid), basically decimating small scale solar in the process. Energy Alabama is currently challenging the “Grid Access Charge” in federal court.

TVA may market like it’s doing wonderful things with renewables but it is mostly hype. At the end of the day, they are doing slightly more utility scale solar that they own and operate but eliminating any options for the average person, small businesses, and communities. They can’t claim they are going to all this effort for renewable energy when they are planning a massive unneeded gas build-out.

 

TVA’s relationship with local power companies

When TVA was created and much of the south was being electrified, TVA grew quickly, much to the alarm of neighboring power companies like Southern Company. They didn’t like TVA growing into their territory. So when a private company doesn’t like something, they call their lobbyists. Federal legislation passed to put a fence around the TVA limiting where they could operate… and also limiting the ability of other utilities to operate inside that area.

TVA has long-term contracts with its local power companies. This is not uncommon in the utility industry and often referred to as “all-requirements” contracts. TVA has massive power plants that generate and sell power to local power companies that they then sell to their members. Contracts were typically 5-10 years, but today TVA is increasing the length of those contracts to 20 years with rolling contracts that require a 20-year notice to cancel. This makes it virtually impossible to get out of the contract.

This still wouldn’t be a totally terrible thing if TVA was responsive to the people. The new contracts claim to allow local power providers 3-5% choice in generation, giving them the option to choose things like rooftop solar and battery storage. It’s an improvement over the complete lack of choice they have now; but, as we see with other power providers across the country, 5% is just unsustainable. Other areas, like Colorado, have tried similar things and found that, given the abundance of cheap, renewable energy, you can hit the cap very quickly. Oh, and it turns out that what TVA said was 5% local choice, was really more like 1-2%. Chalk it up to fuzzy math.

The current setup only benefits TVA; not you and not local communities. It guarantees their revenue in perpetuity and hoses the rest of us, making sure we are always on the hook for TVA’s decisions regardless of how good or bad they are.

 

How can we get out from underneath TVA?

After understanding TVA’s long march away from public power values, there is a desire to just get out from underneath the TVA or to enact serious reforms. To some degree this is more possible now than ever before due to advances in technology. There are options for regular people or businesses to install renewables and energy storage, or for local power companies to substantially generate their own power and not necessarily rely on TVA.

For instance, Memphis is looking at leaving TVA, becoming their own independent utility, and saving a lot of money. That could be great for them. But it could also have a huge effect on any remaining members of the TVA as those costs are passed back.

There is no good answer here. Memphis has an obligation and a responsibility to take the possibility of hundreds of millions in customer savings seriously, and by all accounts it is. The rest of Valley must be concerned about the impact of Memphis leaving TVA. If Memphis did leave TVA, one could only hope it is a sizable enough event to wake TVA out of its slumber.

Memphis is a perfect example of the potential consequences of the failure to adhere to the core principles of public power. To be clear, Energy Alabama does not generally support privatization of public utilities. 

If only there were another way….

What you can do: Tennessee Valley Energy Democracy Movement

The Tennessee Valley Energy Democracy Movement was founded to return TVA to its roots, bring back good paying jobs, and benefit communities. In other words, put the public back into public power.

The largest objective is to bring the people power back to the TVA. It was founded as a public agency but has become less and less responsive to the needs, wants, and demands of the people who are supposed to be in charge of it. That’s you! 

We at Energy Alabama have joined the TVED Movement because we are excited about bringing that voice back.

The movement is about listening to the people and learning what they want their public power to do for them besides just sending them a bill.

Tennessee Valley Energy Democracy Movement is focused on:

  1. Efficient and renewable energy
  2. Local and decentralized generation – economic development opportunities, helping to ensure support of coal communities as those transition, making sure that the transition is equitable and fair for all.
  3. Democratic control – people want to know that their voice matters.
  4. Bills and equitable access – a lot of people don’t think about these issues beyond seeing their bill and struggling to pay it. We have extremely high poverty rates and people often struggle to decide whether to pay their electric bill or feed their family or pick up medicine. This is an unacceptable choice.
  5. Healthy communities and environment – making sure we aren’t just generating electricity but are also feeding the health of the people and the environment.  Here in the south we all have a very strong connection to the outdoors and nature. TVA should continue looking after those aspects as well.
  6. Safe, high quality jobs

How you can help:

  • Visit EnergyDemocracyYall.org and follow them on social media to learn more about the policy platform
  • Talk to your representatives about making sure that TVA is listening to the people. We are starting to see reps at the federal level starting to listen more and understand that we do want to preserve the public power and we need to be acting holistically to avoid privatization.
  • Talk to your local power company – local utilities are usually sub-units of the local government. They should be responsive to local leaders, to local residents.
  • If you are a member of a local electric cooperative, get involved. Run for office, vote, campaign to push these cooperatives to get involved in making change.
  • Keep an eye out for and join us at town hall meetings starting this summer.

It takes people power from the bottom up. 

 

TVA sign at Hyde Park, NY, By Billy Hathorn - Own work, CC0

Sources:

Energy Alabama among groups calling for stop to electricity shutoffs during pandemic

Energy Alabama is among a dozen organizations that have called on the Tennessee Valley Public Power Association (TVPPA) to urge its member utilities to immediately halt service disconnection and late fees for families during the coronavirus pandemic.

 

 

TVPPA’s members include the electric cooperatives and municipal electric utilities who serve 9 million people across seven states in the Tennessee Valley Authority’s service area. In the letter, the groups identified five of TVPPA’s large utilities that had taken these kinds of actions to protect their customers, adding that many TVPPA members may still be charging customers late fees and cutting off service for non-payment.

 

 

TVA has authorized deferred wholesale power payments in its service area, according to the groups’ letter, and increased federal funding to help low-income households with energy bills was included in the recent federal stimulus package. TVPPA members should not cut off service or add late fees onto the bills of families who, through no fault of their own, find themselves in dire economic straits for the foreseeable future.

This tool from Appalachian Voices allows you to find out if your local utility has implemented a Covid-19 policy, and provides information for who to call if they have not done so.